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Willi Paul Franz Lages was a German policeman who joined the Nazi Party in 1933. In 1935, he joined the SS and worked for the Gestapo in his hometown of Braunschweig. When Nazi Germany occupied the Netherlands in May 1940, Lages was posted to Amsterdam and named Commander of the Security Police and Security Service (Kommandeure der Sicherheitspolizei und des Sicherheitsdienstes, KdS) there.
In early 1941, Wilhelm Harster, Commander of the Security Police and Security Service (Befehlshaber der Sicherheitspolizei und des Sicherheitsdienst, BdS) in the Netherlands, named Lages his personal representative in Amsterdam. Lages’ first task in this capacity was to track down the individuals behind the February 1941 general strike against the anti-Jewish measures. Due to his success in completing this assignment, in March 1941 he was placed in charge of the Central Office for Jewish Emigration (Zentralstelle für Jüdische Auswanderung) in Amsterdam. This office was tasked with registering Jews, arresting them for deportation and transfer to collection points; he was also responsible for appropriating their assets. Most of the work of this office, however, was performed by the acting director, Ferdinand aus der Fünten.
After the war, Lages was tried in The Hague and sentenced to death. He was given clemency and remained in the Dutch prison at Breda until he was released in 1966 due to severe illness. He died in 1971 in Germany.

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